Thursday, March 12, 2015

Scholarship Deadline EXTENDED to April 1!

The Albany Roundtable, a civic luncheon series celebrating its 36th season in 2015, is accepting applications for The Albany Roundtable Scholarship.

“The Albany Roundtable has a long history of providing a forum for discussion on the issues of the day,” said Albany Roundtable President Chris Hawver. “We hope that these scholarships will help to foster a new generation of civic leaders who will go on to contribute to their communities in ways that we cannot yet imagine.”

Two scholarships in the amount of $1,000 each will be awarded to two high school seniors who are recommended by a member in good standing of the Albany Roundtable. The application must be submitted by a student in his or her senior year of high school, and will be awarded contingent upon acceptance and attendance at a two- or four-year college or university.

Applications must be postmarked no later than Wednesday, April 1, 2015, and the scholarships will be awarded at the Roundtable’s Annual Meeting on Thursday, May 21.

A short questionnaire, available below and at Roundtable meetings in January, February and March, must be accompanied by a letter of recommendation from a teacher or counselor at the applicant’s school, or if the student is home-schooled, by a member of the community. An official transcript including courses, grades and grade point average should be included, as well as an essay of 300-500 words on the following topic: Citizenship includes the exercise of certain personal responsibilities, including considering the rights and interests of others. Discuss your involvement in a civic capacity which demonstrates your commitment to the community. This can include religious, social, and/or political activities.

Applications may be mailed to the Roundtable or may be submitted by email to ecrosen52@gmail.com .

1 comment:

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